Hanun

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Fausset's Bible Dictionary [1]

1. Son of Nahash, king of Ammon 1037 B.C. David had in his outlawry by Saul received kindness from Nahash; naturally, as Nahash was (1 Samuel 11) Saul's enemy and neighbour of Moab with which David's descent from the Moabitess Ruth connected him. He therefore at Nahash's death sent a message of condolence to his son Hanun. As gratitude, kindness, and sympathy characterized David's conduct, so ingratitude, uncharitable suspiciousness, and insolent injustice characterized Hanun. Insulting the ambassadors (by shaving half the beard, which is a foul insult in oriental estimation, and cutting off their skirts) brought on himself and his country a disastrous war which ended in the capture of Rabbah and of the royal crown, and the cruelest retaliations on their fighting men of their own cruelties to Israel (2 Samuel 10;  2 Samuel 12:30-31; 1 Chronicles 19-20).

2.  Nehemiah 3:13.

3.  Nehemiah 3:30.

Smith's Bible Dictionary [2]

Ha'nun. (Favored).

1. Son of Nahash,  2 Samuel 10:1-2;  1 Chronicles 19:1-2, king of Ammon, who dishonored the ambassadors of David,  2 Samuel 10:4, and involved the Ammonites in a disastrous war,  2 Samuel 12:31;  1 Chronicles 19:6. (B.C. 1035).

2. A man who, with the people of Zanoah, repaired the ravine gate in the wall of Jerusalem.  Nehemiah 3:13. (B.C. 446).

3. The sixth son of Zalalph, who also assisted in the repair of the wall, apparently on the east side.  Nehemiah 3:30. (B.C. 446).

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible [3]

Hanun (‘favoured’). 1. The son of Nahash, king of the Ammonites. Upon the death of the latter, David sent a message of condolence to Hanun, who, however, resented this action, and grossly insulted the messengers. The consequence was a war, which proved most disastrous to the Ammonites (  2 Samuel 10:1 ff.,   1 Chronicles 19:1 ff.). 2, 3. The name occurs twice in the list of those who repaired the wall and the gates of Jerus. (  Nehemiah 3:13;   Nehemiah 3:30 ).

People's Dictionary of the Bible [4]

Hanun ( Hă'Nun ), Favored. 1. The son of Nahash, king of the Ammonites. He disgraced David's ambassadors, and thus caused the ruin of his people.  2 Samuel 10:1-19;  1 Chronicles 19:2. One who, with the inhabitants of Zanoah, helped to repair the wall of Jerusalem.  Nehemiah 3:13. 3. Another person, apparently, who also helped in repairing the wall.  Nehemiah 3:30.

Easton's Bible Dictionary [5]

  • 3:30.

    Copyright Statement These dictionary topics are from M.G. Easton M.A., DD Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition, published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain.

    Bibliography Information Easton, Matthew George. Entry for 'Hanun'. Easton's Bible Dictionary. https://www.studylight.org/dictionaries/eng/ebd/h/hanun.html. 1897.

  • Morrish Bible Dictionary [6]

    1. Son of Nahash and king of Ammon: he insulted the ambassadors of David, and was severely punished for his insolence.  2 Samuel 10:1-4;  1 Chronicles 19:2-6 . He is a type of those who, refusing the proffered grace of God, will suffer by His judgements.

    2,3. Two who helped to repair the wall of Jerusalem.   Nehemiah 3:13,30 .

    American Tract Society Bible Dictionary [7]

    A king of the Ammonites, whose father Nahash had befriended David in his early troubles. Upon the death of Nahash, David sent an embassage to condole with his son. The shameful treatment received by these ambassadors led to a destructive war upon the Ammonites,  2 Samuel 10:1 -  19;  1 Chronicles 19:1-19 .

    Holman Bible Dictionary [8]

     2 Samuel 10:1 Nehemiah 3:13 Nehemiah 3:30

    Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature [9]

    (Heb. Chanun', חָנוּן , Favored), the name of three men.

    1. (Sept. Ἀννών and Ἀνάν ) The son and successor of Nahash, king of the Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 10:14;  1 Chronicles 19:2-6). David, who had in his troubles been befriended by Nahash, sent, with the kindest intentions, an embassy to condole with Hanun on the death of his father, and to congratulate him on his own accession. B.C. cir. 1035. The rash young king, however, was led to misapprehend the motives of this embassy, and to treat with gross and inexpiable indignity the honorable personages whom David had charged with this mission. Their beards were half shaven, and their robes cut short by the middle, and they were dismissed in this shameful trim, which can be appreciated only by those who consider how reverently the beard has al-ways been regarded by the Orientals. (See Beard). When the news of this affront was brought to David, He sent word to the ambassadors to remain at Jericho till the growth of their beards enabled them to appear with decency in the metropolis. He vowed vengeance upon Hanun for the insult; and the vehemence with which the matter was taken up forms an instance, interesting from its antiquity, of the respect expected to be paid to the person and character of ambassadors. Hanun himself looked for nothing less than war as the consequence of his conduct; and he subsidized Hadarezer and other Syrian princes to assist him with their armies. The power of the Syrians was broken in two campaigns, and the Ammonites were left to their fate, which was severe even beyond the usual severities of war in that remote age. B.C. cir. 1034. (See Ammonite); (See David).

    2. (Sept. Ἀνούν .) A person who repaired (in connection with the inhabitants of Zanoah) the Valley gate of Jerusalem after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 3:13). B.C. 446.

    3. (Sept. Ἀνώμ .) A son ("the sixth") of Zalaph, who likewise repaired part of the walls of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:30). B.C. 446.

    Kitto's Popular Cyclopedia of Biblial Literature [10]

    Hanun (bestower), son and successor of Nahash, king of the Ammonites. David, who had in his troubles been befriended by Nahash, sent, with the kindest intentions, an embassy to condole with him on the death of his father, and to congratulate him on his own accession. The rash young king, however, was led to misapprehend the motives of this embassy, and to treat with gross and inexpiable indignity the honorable personages whom David had charged with this mission. Their beards were half shaven, and their robes cut short by the middle, and they were dismissed in this shameful trim, which can be appreciated only by those who consider how reverently the beard has always been regarded by the Orientals [[[Beard] (BC]] 1038). When the news of this affront was brought to David, he sent word to the ambassadors to remain at Jericho till the growth of their beards enabled them to appear with decency in the metropolis. He vowed vengeance upon Hanun for the insult; and the vehemence with which the matter was taken up forms an instance, interesting from its antiquity, of the respect expected to be paid to the person and character of ambassadors. Hanun himself looked for nothing less than war as the consequence of his conduct; and he subsidized Hadarezer and other Syrian princes to assist him with their armies. The power of the Syrians was broken in two campaigns, and the Ammonites were left to their fate, which was severe even beyond the usual severities of war in that remote age [[[Ammonites; David]]] (2 Samuel 10; 1 Chronicles 19).

    International Standard Bible Encyclopedia [11]

    hā´nun ( חנון , ḥānūn , "favored," "pitied"):

    (1) A son and successor of Nahash, king of Ammon. Upon the death of Nahash, David sent sympathetic communications to Hanun, which were misinterpreted and the messengers dishonored. Because of this indignity, David waged a war against him, which caused the Ammonites to lose their independence ( 2 Samuel 10:1;  1 Chronicles 19:1 ).

    (2) One of the six sons of Zalaph who assisted in repairing the East wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:30 ).

    (3) One of the inhabitants of Zanoah who repaired the Valley Gate in the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:13 ).

    References